Donor Eggs & Sperm

Donor Eggs & Sperm

Donor Sperm

The decision to donate to help an infertile person or couple is a serious one and may have life-long consequences. Your doctor will provide information on the medical aspects and will explore the social and emotional issues associated with your decision. Donors, recipients and individuals all have legal rights and responsibilities.

Confidentiality and the access of identifying information

Donations can be made anonymously BUT a donor must consent to having identifying details accessible to any donor conceived child at the age of 18, upon request. These details are: full name, address and date of birth. (See NHMRC “Ethical guidelines on the use of assisted reproductive technology in clinical practice and research”, June 2007 www.nhrmrc.gov.au) Other information about the donor and the outcomes of the treatment is stored in clinic records. Strict practices apply to the protection of confidentiality.

Legal rights and responsibilities

Your legal rights and responsibilities in the ACT are covered by the Parentage Act. This states that the domestic partner of the recipient is presumed to be a parent of any child born from the donation of gametes or embryos. The donor is conclusively presumed not to be a parent (mother or father) of any child born because of pregnancy. Hence the donor has no rights in relation to the child and no responsibilities, even if the donor is known to the recipient.

The Sperm Donation Process

The Sperm Donation Process

The Sperm Donation Process

The Sperm Donation Process

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